Bird & Parrot Cage Buying FAQ’s

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The WindyCityParrot.com FAQ’s of Cage Buying

The cage has to meet not only the requirements of your birds but should blend with your lifestyle. The cage may reside in a casual family room or a formal living room. Maybe you’re lucky (or crazy) enough to have a bird room. There’s a lot of factors and everyone has an opinion.

So don’t listen to us. Listen to you. Answer some of these questions and you’ll make a good selection

What Size Cage?

Have you heard “buy the biggest cage you can afford”? Nonsense! We know happy well adjusted Macaws living in 30″ diameter round cages. How could they, you gasp?

The three Macaws I’m referring to have stay-at-home mom. They are out from 6:00 in the morning till 9:00 at night and are thrilled to go to sleep in their narrow cages.

So before you decide on a cage, you need to know what bar spacing to look for:

As long as the spacing between the bars is narrow enough to prevent injury if the bird tries to escape. The Bird’s head should not be able to fit between the bars. The door needs to be large enough to comfortably put your hand through, catch the bird, remove the bird, and replace the bird. For larger birds, it needs to be big enough so they don’t rub feathers on the bars every time they turn around. And like people, birds like to stretch (I know an African Grey that does Yoga). Just don’t cramp the bird.

Here’s some general guidelines:

SMALL: Examples, Finches, Canaries, Parrotlets, Parakeets, Lovebirds: Cage Bar Spacing: No more than 5/8″.Perch Diameter: 3/8″ to 3/4″

MEDIUM: Examples: Cockatiels, Conures, Lories, Senegals. Cage Bar Spacing: 1/2″ to no more than 3/4″
Perch Diameter: 5/8″ to 1 1/4″

LARGE: Examples: African Greys, Amazons, Macaws, Cockatoos. Cage Bar Spacing: 3/4″ to no more than 1 1/4″.
Perch Diameter 1″ to 2″

What Species?
Different species, different needs.

Small species (Finches, Canaries, Lovebirds and Parakeets) deserve wider cages because birds travel side-to-side. Many of the small species never leave their cages. You have to let them fly because it’s heart healthy.

Medium and larger birds have a different set of needs. So let’s apply some common sense. Do you have a big bird? Are you away a lot? Then try to get a bigger cage. (Would you like to spend all day in a room the size of a closet?)

Bigger cages allow birds move about much like we move about our home. Ideally parrots like three zones. The upper zone, should have lots of toys and “cover”. Birds feel safe up high, not easily seen, like in the wild. (Don’t we feel comfy in our bedrooms?)

The middle zone is where they’ll spend the day, playing with toys, eating, hanging out.

The bottom is where they’ll go to look for food and toys that may have dropped. Parrots are scavengers in nature.

Do I need feeding doors

We suggest feeding doors for a couple of reasons. For the smaller birds, its less invasive than sticking a hand in the cage. If you go away for a day or more with a larger bird, feeder door enable “bird sitters” to replace food and water without placing their hands in the cage.

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