My bird won’t play with toys or eat new foods are two problems that solve each other

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A clear theme that emerges after reading endless threads on Facebook bird groups is “my bird won’t play with toys” – “my bird doesn’t play with toys” “my bird only wants to chew the keys off my notebook computer”

From wikipedia we learn: Ho·lis·tic – hōˈlistik – adjective – characterized by comprehension of the parts of something as intimately interconnected and explicable only by reference to the whole.

Another way of putting it is “we are not connecting the dots” Bird food is connected to bird toys which are connected to bird cages and bird stands and everything has to work together.

There is a large overlap of caged bird keepers who claim the birds will eat nothing new nor with a play with toys – which is the problem and the solution – we need to combine the toys with the food – for starters.

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Canaries – Nature’s IPods – Why They Sing

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Before iPods there were boomboxes. Before boomboxes there were stereo radios. Precursors to phonographs were Victrolas. But the way to get tunes in your home long before there was electricity was the natural sound of bird songs. For years people would place a Canary in a small cage on either side of the room and whoever did that first can take credit for inventing stereo sound.

Canaries are small songbirds coming from the Finch family and were initially found in places like the Azores and believe it or not the Canary Islands

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Cook Comfort Foods for Your Birds

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The weather is cooling off and humans like to begin cooking comfort foods such as pots of chili, chicken and dumplings, bean soups and other hearty meals to warm the tummy and spirit. The same applies true to your parrots.

As the weather becomes colder, we slowly lower our indoor temperatures unless we don’t care how high our heating bills run. It is important to remember that if you are cold, your birds are chilly as well and need to have supplemental heat such as thermo perches or heated cage panels that allow them to position themselves at the temperature they prefer.

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Gemma Parakeets and Cockatiels Mixing in Cage/Aviary

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Sep 11, 10:04pm

Hello!

We are loyal patrons of WCP and look forward to the Sunday brunch every week. Perhaps this topic has already come up, but it is a question about bird species.

We have 3 parakeets that get along well although they did not grow up together. All are rescues. We are thinking about adding a cockatiel to the family, and are wondering about cages. So, the parakeets have a large cage (approx 2.5′ H x 2′ W X 1′ D) and we have a smaller cage (about 1.5′ HWD) that is just lying around empty.

First question: would a cockatiel require a separate cage or could they all sleep together in the same cage?

Second: Assuming that they cannot share a cage, would you recommend the keets in the smaller cage or leave them in their current habitat?

Third: Would cockatiels and parakeets be competitive/territorial in an open space (like an aviary)?

Thank you for any advice you have on this.

Cheers,

Gemma

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Joyce about taking birds outdoors

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On Sun, Oct 16, 2016 at 12:54 PM UTC, Joyce wrote:

Hello,

We live in southern TX, and would like to take our Amazon outside since the weather is so nice this time of year. I will purchase a cage of course, but my concerns are what types of bugs and disease am I potentially going to expose her to? She will also be in a covered patio. How do I keep her safe?

Thank You,

Joyce

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Should I get my companion sun conure a buddy?

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October 12
From Veronica

Hello again. We have chatted before. thanks for previous advice. We have a one year old female sun conure and we are thinking about getting her a buddy. Perhaps a male sun (red factor) or just another parrot critter. If we chose another species, what would you suggest as a good companion for her, not including parakeets for cockatiels?

Thanks

Hi Veronica and thanks for asking Windy City Parrot for advice on your situation.

I am sort of the sun conure expert around here I guess, having owned 3 personally at various times in my life. My first I bought as a baby, just  weaned. The second a lady gave me as a young bird but she passed away in a very unfortunate accident and the third I did the final hand feeding only to have him fall in love with my boyfriend so, when we split up, I let the sun conure stay with the ex  because Mango would have missed him so terribly and I had to think of what was best for the bird.

I have to ask you a couple of questions and once I have the answers I will be able to provide more advice (so please get back to me on it): WHY do you want to get your female sun a buddy? And is your female  sun DNA sexed to be sure she really is a she? Okok, I’m going for 4 questions: Do you plan to house them in the same cage? And why do you rule out parakeets?

I’m going to answer your question from personal experience. When my first sun conure, SunDance, was 10+ years old she made it perfectly clear she wanted a mate. So we let her choose one.

My elderly mom and I shared a condo that was all-tile flooring, but had plenty furniture and wall decor in the great room where SunDance had her house (read cage if you prefer). We had area rugs on the floor and the neighbors never heard any real noise from her unless they were outdoors. She was not a screamer, just the usual morning welcome calls, goodbye screech when she we told her “bye, we’ll be back soon”, and hello calls plus the normal conure screams of fear from lawnmowers, hawk-like birds or shadows, flashing lights, etc., and an occasional contact call which, if answered, ended the calling. She was quiet for a sun conure. We were very happy with her noise level and so were our neighbors and friends.

So, since she wanted a partner/mate, I decided to let her choose one. She did. Now we had two sun conures making all the above normal calls each BUT we also had the contact calls between the two, even after the quarantine period and they lived in the same huge cage.

You have no idea how loud two sun conures calling in unison or to each other can be. Suddenly it seemed the very earth echoed every call. And when bonded birds, even if not mated, make contact calls it tends to go like this: she calls, he answers, she answers, he answers ad nauseam ad deafness….you get idea. Suddenly it was nerve wrecking.

That is one issue with adding either same gender or a pair of sun conures inside a home. You’ll read more about these two in a future Birdie Brunch post. But the point is, one bird makes some noise, the other bird makes some noise but in this situation 1 plus 1 can equal 12+ in the noise increase!! Not to mention there was twice as much mess to clean up, but if that were the only issue, things would have been happy.

Eventually because the two did not mate (I didn’t know at that early state of parrot learning that breeding wasn’t a great idea anyway) and the noise was making mother and I want to run away from home, we were forced to rehome the male. Had they been forced to live in two cages I think the noise would have been much worse.

Screaming Conure

Secondly, if you place a male and female of the same species or ones close enough to mate successfully together and they bond, nature (in most cases, not in my two) takes it’s natural course and you can end up with babies.

There are far, far too many unwanted sun conures in rescues to add more babies into the world unless they are of very special gene pools, strong ones and both birds have had an absolutely perfect diet and exercise program all their lives — plus their ancestors had to have had the same. Otherwise you could end up with bad natured babies, or chronic egg laying, or in the worst case an egg bound hen that you don’t get help for in time and you lose your beloved friend.

Avian Vet Saves Egg Bound Hen

Even if you got a second parrot of the same gender or a totally different species that would adapt and be friends with your sun conure so there would be no babies, hormones could still result in eggs and potential egg binding.

Thirdly, conures like most parrots are flock animals. Right now your young sun is precious and cute and probably interacts with you all the time when you are home. This is because a single tame companion parrot accepts the humans in the household as its artificial flock, eating when they do, wanting to be with the family, wanting to be loved, tickled and given attention, and generally with conures and suns especially, cuddled and snuggled with. When you add another parrot of similar size, even if not of the same species, to the mix, your beloved companion may have no need of you as a flock member, becoming untamed and wanting little or nothing to do with you.

Image result for bonded sun conure

These two conures create their own flock and don’t need a human flock

If you fear your bird is lonely during the times of day that perhaps you have to work outside the home, if you have provided a rich cage environment with lots of chewing, foraging, perches of different textures and sizes including soft perches, climbing and challenging toys, a place for privacy and lots of interesting foods, the  bird will be happy enough while you are away as long as you spend QUALITY out of cage time with her when you get home. For more info on these issues, please read blog post and “The Cage Canopy Concept”. Many companion birds sleep a lot of the time their humans are away, eating, playing then napping for quite a while, and repeat. Unless you are away a great deal, say sunup to darkness 6 days or more per week and busy most evenings so that you can’t give your bird quality time with you, the bird is happy enough as a single parrot. Please excuse any missing images, videos or links in the referred blog posts as we are still putting the final paint and polish in some places from our recent website redesign and migration. We kindly ask that you bear with us.

Baby Conure Playing With Toys

I actually twice have had a sun conure voluntarily allow a parakeet to move in with the bigger bird and live happily together. They didn’t play together a lot, but they got along well and clearly wanted to reside together since in both cases each bird had its own perfect cage with everything it could want. Keets are so tenacious they simply won’t allow a sun conure, usually a rather ‘fraidy bird’ personality type, to hurt them or run them over. Of course I did supervise quite a while before I allowed this situation to be the norm to ensure no harm to either bird.

But if you can provide your young sun conure with quality out of cage time with the human family on a daily basis — QUALITY being the key word rather than length actual number of hours — you will probably be happiest with one tame, snuggly loving sun conure.

Instead of spending a lot of money on a additional living creature that may make things LESS perfect rather than more perfect, why not get lots of toys, interesting ways to serve food like kabobs, foraging opportunities, and puzzles (most conures love puzzles, untying knots, challenges) so that when your bird has to be in its cage it is happy, entertained when not napping, and will be thrilled when you do arrive home and include her in your daily life.

Conure solves puzzle toy

Change toys often except for one or two favorites that can be moved (and her bed if she uses one), rearrange, reintroduce, buy a play stand or cage for every room where the bird may be with you, and the best food (and supplements if a seed diet is used but not needed if top-quality pellets are fed) and treats as well as healthy human foods.

And don’t forget the yearly well-bird checkups with the best avian vet in your area so you have a relationship and records should illness or accident (or the aforementioned egg binding) strike.

Check supplies of every type suitable for a conure,  health, first aid, grooming and similar needs,  stands for placing in other rooms or areas where you spend time with your bird, and habitat enrichment. Also if you wish to keep her flighted, a harness or flight suit is ideal so she can go outdoors for healthy air and sunlight while watching that she doesn’t get too hot or cold.

Warm Snuggle Hut for Birds Medium GreenMango in Snuggle Hut Birdie Tent at Bedtime

Notice in the habitat area that the bird in the “bedtime” subcategory is a sun conure and at the bottom of the page is the story of my Mango getting a new Snuggle Hut. These birds seem to have a need to hide when sleeping, at least in my experience, though a privacy area can work if you don’t like the idea of a bed. Oh, and just in case something got missed in our recent move, but sure to go through toys, especially preening/foraging and interactive ones and food sections.

Find All Birdie Bed Time Products HereHow Do Birds Sleep Standing On 1 Leg

If you have further questions or if I can help in any way, please just contact me. After all, it’s all about birds and  We Speak Bird!

written by nora caterino
approved by mitch rezman

(*´∀`)ノ Holy crap we just rescued 2 more birds ヽ(゚〇゚)ノ

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File under: riding the cosmic coaster

About a month after Popcorn had passed Catherine and I made big plans to get a new bird after we launched the new Windy City Parrot. I casually mentioned that I was thinking of an African bird like a Senegal.

Sometimes when we get deliveries of bird food a bag is broken or torn and cannot be sold as new. We get credit for that bag and we store them in a refrigerator in the back of the store. We give these bags to our local customers as it is too expense to ship them.

A couple weeks ago Catherine casually mentioned that we were ready to begin a serious search for a new bird.

Carmel, a very good customer of ours was in the Birdie Boutique one day. We give her a lot of the food because we know she passes it on to a local rescue run by a woman we found was named Pat.

Turns out we knew Pat from the bird fairs years back when we were vending at the bird clubs and events.

Peaches, a Senegal parrot, clearly did not like all the other birds in Pat’s rescue. Senegals tend to be quiet.

At the same time we had made a decision to get Bacon, our newly rescued budgie a cage mate because he was clearly unhappy alone and we knew it would take a long time to socialize him. What the heck – we asked Pat if she also had a budgie she could spare.

Cosmos speaking to us -> the day after Peaches came into our lives, I had to do some banking in our new bank. We set up some new accounts and I really hadn’t paid attention to how money was coming and going.

Funny story – one of the accounts that I expected to have $10 had $954. Some dumb credit card processing center had somehow sent this money to the wrong account which I had been chasing for two weeks and was getting nowhere.

Thank you Peaches <- THERE’S YOUR SIGN

The video explains it all.

the digital journey

Subject: Senegal

Dear Pat, It was good to talk to you again. Time flies by so fast. Yes, Mitch and I are looking for a new forever bird. We had Sunshine, our Indian Ringneck, for many years until he passed. I bought him at a GCCBC bird fair about 30 years ago.

Then we went a couple of years bird-less until Popcorn flew into our lives; she was a great little girl. Sadly we lost her to her hormones and most likely cancer. I wish we knew then what we know now.

We were able to stop her hormonal behavior with the 72 hour light cycle we put her through, but by then it was too late. We have had others try it on their own birds and it works.

We currently have a tiny male parakeet foundling who is not tame and does not want to be from what we can see so we are going to get it a buddy in a week or so as we are waiting 30 days to see if the owner shows up.

We would love to see the Senegal you were talking about. Please send me any information, regarding a rescue. We have never adopted before, but we want to have an older bird, not a baby at this point in our lives.

Dear Pat, Thank you for the pictures of Mishu. She looks cute. Does not look mean, LOL, but has a look like “what are you doing?” Is she flighted? We do believe in allowing a bird to fly but also know a bird in a new environment can fly right into danger.

We would clip once, so she would not be able to harm herself. Then when the feathers grow back, she would have full flight available forever. When we brought Popcorn home she had to be clipped as she was just so confused and within a month had molted and grown new feathers; that was great.

Mitch works at home most of the time so he is able to allow the bird to be out. Every room has a stand as we feel if a bird lands on something and destroys it, it is not their fault if we have not provided a stand for it.

We never allow them to fly around other rooms unless we are with them. We have a lot of doors that can be closed keeping the bird in the same room we are. I don’t know if you have seen our BLOG or are signed up for it, but seeing it would show you what sticklers we are at bird care.

senegal parrot on back i womans hand with bracelet on wrist

Windy City Parrot's Blog Home Page

Hi Catherine.  I am a caregiver for my elderly mother so weeknights will not work for me.  I can bring her to you maybe Thursday or Friday this week.  We will start off with a foster contract to see how it goes for a month.

I typically do a home inspection but not necessary for you.  Her name is Mishu which was given to her by a former owner.  He purchased her from a Rolling Meadows bird show breeder.  I was there the day he got her so I know she is six years old.  

This was the son of a good friend of mine who was living with a girlfriend.  When he got home she was furious about bringing the bird home.  Told him “it is me or the bird”.  

So I have had her her whole life.  I’m sad that I am offering her a new home but know you will give her the best home possible.  I have been her only human interaction so I am not sure if she will warm up to Mitch. All I can suggest is give her time.

Let me know if and when I can drop her off to you.  I assume you will use Popcorn ‘s cage for her.

Dear Pat, Wow, that is quite a story, but it is nice to know her history too. We would be honored to try to see how it works out. Yes, we would love to do this. Mitch works from home currently so he would be with her all the time. He intends to work from an office being set up by the shop at some point (going slowly) and then he would take her with him to a cage in the office. It would be a rare day that she would be left alone all day.

Yes, you can do the home inspection, you would be coming by so all would be shown anyway. We are cautious bird owners, toilet seats stay closed, garbage cans stay closed, no open glasses of water or other beverages. 

We currently have the parakeet in Popcorn’s cage and we intend to get a buddy for the single parakeet and then put them in a new cage. So we have to do some set up at home before we can bring home Mishu.

Next week would be better for us so we can get another cage for the keet ready.  The keets will live at home and not travel with us, they won’t be in the same area and will always be caged for their safety.

Hi Catherine, Next week is better for me also.  I like the proposed schedule you will have for Mishu.  Feel free to change her name.  I’m not sure she recognizes it.  She loves attention and will come to the front of the cage to come out or for head and neck scratches.

Where are you planning to get another parakeet?  I got Carmel a beautiful parakeet as a partner for her single bird.  She takes all my rescued parakeets. Let me know if you want a male or female.  This time Wednesday or Thursday next week is OK for me to bring Mishu to you. Probably around 1 pm after I make lunch for my mom. Whatever works for you. Talk to you later.

Dear Pat, It all sounds wonderful. Nothing should be rushed when it comes to a new family member. I will discuss it all with Mitch later tonight. I know he is excited about the prospect.

We have been together for 15 years, I had Sunshine when I met him and they were fine together but of course Sunshine was my bird. When Popcorn came into our lives they bonded so well. He could handle her so well, but she did not care for me unless he was not around for awhile. It was all on her terms if she rode on me around the house, let me pet her, etc.

Mitch was not new to birds prior to our meeting, his ex had a ringneck, a toe biting cherry headed conure and a sweet white capped pionus so he was no stranger to parrots when we met. LOL.

Dear Pat, Mitch is all in on the plan. We will be bringing in a new cage for the parakeets as quickly as possible, something from Prevue we can pick up by Friday.

Yes, we would be fine with you picking out a buddy for Bacon. A boy, we don’t want to breed them, just let them enjoy being budgies together. We think by the feathering, and the eyes that Bacon is about 9 months old. Color-wise something to go with a Blue and White budgie, LOL.

Hi Pat, Wednesday is good, Mitch will be here. And yes, Bacon is a boy, it was up in the air for a bit as it was very light blue and when we took a couple of pictures it faded to white so we thought it was a girl, but the blue is deepening a bit. So we want another boy to avoid eggs. I will try to snag a couple pics to send anyway.

bacon the budgie in his cage close up

We are getting a cage in for the keets tomorrow. I want a fancy one for them but it is not in the budget right now so I am getting a decent sized cage and stand for them, 26 x 14 x 36 high. We will furnish it for the keets, can’t wait. I so want Bacon to be happy. He really looks so sad all alone. He has no interest in us.

Great on the clipped wings, has she always been clipped? If her nails need it, please it would be nice so we don’t have to subject her to that. We do our birds nails ourselves but it is never a bonding experience. LOL. We are getting excited.

Catherine, The cage for the parakeets is more than adequate size for them.  I personally don’t like the fancy ones (with the indented roof lines at the top).  It is wasted space and the birds wouldn’t go there.  They like to perch high up. Have you thought about introducing them slowly to each other by putting them side by side in separate cages for a short time?  It gives them a chance to get to know one another before putting them in the same cage.

As with all my birds no matter the breed, I include a separate food and water cup for each bird on separate sides of the cage.  Unfortunately, birds can starve a mate by being aggressive and not sharing their dishes. I know a few of my clients that it has happened so it is good to observe their behavior.  

You may not encounter this since one of the birds is quite young and should adapt easier to an older bird. Just like people, the older birds get set in their ways which can be problematic . . . LOL.  If you do want to keep them separate for a short time,  I have an inventory of cages you can use.

I truly hope the adoption of Mishu will be successful. Not all of them go smoothly.  I have had several for one reason or another that failed.  I wanted to prepare you in the event it happens.  I truly believe a bird chooses the family to love.  Giving Mishu time to settle in will be the test.

I am excited for her to join your family.  It will be a sad day and I may shed some tears.  She loves me so much but it is the right thing to do for her. As I mentioned, I will ask you to sign a very simple temporary contract that states she will be in your care until we both decide to make it a permanent adoption or return her to me.  It may take more than a month to come to that decision.  I am open to a time frame. 

Looking forward to seeing you and Mitch on Wednesday with Mishu and the new parakeet.  Let me know if you have any questions.

Dear Pat, We have been thinking about you and everything a lot. We are excited. The keet sounds adorable. Mitch is working on the cages today. I wish I could be there for the arrival. But Mitch plans to record it all.

Hi Catherine,  I am prepared for my visit tomorrow to bring Mishu and the little parakeet.  It will take me almost two hours in travel time.  I will be coming via Milwaukee Avenue past Dr. Sakas office.  

We can talk about making some fresh veggies for the parakeets.  A friend of mine uses a food processor or chopper to make the veggie mix as small as possible. The ingredients are the same for all birds.

This little parakeet is so adorable.  I believe it is a male. He is only 11 weeks old and fully weaned.  I’ve watched him eat seed, drink and eat some millet.  He is very tame.  

Pat, The keets diet – Maybe you can help me with the keets on getting them to eat well too. I am familiar with them being given nothing but seed and water and then they die young.

That is not what I want to do of course. Right now I started with a good Budgie seed mix by Hagen Living World that has seeds, dried fruits and veggies and tiny pellets. I also added some Leafy Greens and another mix by Higgins Small Fruits & Veggies, but want to encourage fresh food. Not so easy when the bird is so tiny.

I figure I can start with a hunk of romaine clipped to the cage, but beyond that, I am stumped. I admit parakeets are not in my list of birds I have had before. I did have a good number of beautiful Australian Grass keets years ago but they were big enough to eat my usual veggies and fruit mixes I gave to all the birds.

Catherine, Mishu is a very good eater.  All (even the doves) get a vegetable mix that includes plain pasta at 7:00 am every morning (all other food has been removed).  It is left in the cage for no more than 3 hours.  They are then given a mix of seed and pellets (more pellets than seed).  I mostly use Higgins brand for the seed and Zupreem for the pellets.  I also sometimes use Roudybush and Higgins In-Tune pellets.  I like to change it up so they don’t become bored.  Then at dinner time they get fruit. She loves apples very much.

I placed her on the jungle gym this morning while I was having a discussion with my mom’s hospice nurse. Mishu began crying and swaying back and forth.  The nurse said it sounded like a kitten.  She could be mimicking cats I had before they died of old age.  She wanted me to pick her up.  I also heard her trying to talk. I think she has unlimited potential.  I feel bad that I have not been able to give her as much attention she deserves.  She has out of cage time everyday.   She is not a vocal bird so she will not make a lot of noise.

Pat, I am not concerned with her talking, although if she does, that is fine too. At her age it is doubtful she will start. My male ringneck started to talk at 6 1/2 months old and was a sponge for new words until he was about 3 then had no interest in learning more.

bacon 7 eggs budgies on thermo perchg

We just set up the new cage for the keets, it is HUGE. I think they will be fine. I will be ordering another cage light for the keets cage as it is a dim corner.

I just cleaned up Popcorn’s cage (also the temporary Bacon home). Take a look, it you think it is too busy you are welcome to tell Mitch what needs to be done.

Both cages are not perfect, they don’t have grilles that slide out so I put paper on top of the grilles to make clean up easier. But until we can order new ones, they will be fine.

It will be very exciting to come how to a house full of chirping again. Mitch said he would be waiting for you on the front steps, LOL.

Dear Pat, Which Higgins seed mix did you use for Mishu? I am guessing a Conure Mix?

Higgins Sunburst Conure bird food blend is a nice one, it has Higgins Intune Pellets in it and I can also feed additional Intune Pellets available in a separate bag. I will bring them home tonight.

Catherine, That Higgins blend is good also.  I’ve been ordering Higgins Safflower Parrot and the Sunburst Conure mix as well so that is perfect.  This month I’ve changed the pellets to Zupreem.   You will find Mishu is not a picky eater and should do well for you.  I was going to bring a supply of food for her but sounds like you have what she likes.  I try not to order any blends with peanuts or sunflower.

Pat

P.S. Tell Mitch I will be bringing my female cockatoos along but will leave them in the car. They will be fine. My husband works from home and has a conference call during the time I will be away.  They scream if I am not there to quiet them.  They are quiet in the car so don’t worry about your neighbors.

Post The Arrival of Pat and Parrots:

Hi Mitch and Catherine.  I am very pleased on how the transition of these two birds went today.  I have high hopes that the parakeets will become best buds.  It took them all of 5 minutes before they were sitting side by side.  

If I could put a caption to it “you blink I am dominant one” . . .lol.  Since Eggs is only 11 weeks old please observe him eating and drinking.  I had his dishes on the bottom of the cage in case he couldn’t get to them higher up.  I forgot to give you some millet to give him a little to supplement his diet.

I am also happy Mishu stepped up to Mitch.  She was a little tentative but will get better in time (it might have been the facial hair).  She went right inside her cage to settle in.  She does like to be out on top of the cage so I’m not sure if she will with the light on top.

You’ll have to see how it goes.  Other option would be a separate device like a small jungle gym so she can get away from her safe place (cage).  It would be best to work with her away from the cage.  Don’t be afraid to stroke her neck and head and make those mouth gestures she loves to do.  Give me an update in a day or two on both of them.

Catherine, I gave Mitch 3 small bags of veggies.  He froze 2 of them.  Use the one we left out giving her 1/2 today and 1/2 tomorrow.  After that it will become rancid. I left you a list of ingredients I use to make it.  I forgot to put fruit on the list.  

She loves apples and anything else you want to try.  You can use the same menu for the keets just mash it up real good.  As you said you can clip some dark leafy green lettuce inside the cage as a treat.  Also gave Mitch some almonds for Mishu.  She can have 2 or 3 almonds or walnuts a day.  I’ve read recently that birds could have scrambled eggs in organic coconut oil only 2 times a month.

I probably sound like a nervous Nellie so I will close for now. Any questions let me know.  We can work thru any issues that may come up. Thanks and good luck!  I am up around 5 am daily which means I go to bed between 9 and 10 pm.  Feel free to contact me anytime.  I also have text capabilities.

Pat

written by catherine tobsing
approved by mitch rezman
approved by nora caterino

your zygodactyl footnote

What humidifier is right for my bird?

Read in 2 minutes

Hi Jo-Anne

 Keep in mind there is not a lot of Teflon in humidifiers most are more metal and plastic but if you’re not sure check with the manufacturer.  
While most studies indicate that PTFEs & PFOAs offgas at temperatures above 500 degrees Fahrenheit, there is information that some formulations will offg as between 360 degrees and 450 degrees Fahrenheit. I don’t think Teflon is your problem with a humidifier.  Continue reading “What humidifier is right for my bird?” »

Budgies are NOT like cockatiels – perch placement in the cage is very different

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Most cage bird keepers assume a bird is a bird a perch is a perch a cage is a cage. The previous statement is highly inaccurate.

About a decade ago I coined the term “cagescaping” (but no one remebers) Our specialties at Windy City Parrot   are avian nutrition and the implementation of proper caged bird and home habitats based on species.

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This video is a perfect example of how you have to take into consideration the species of the bird when designing its forever environment.

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Where to Put a Swing & How to Get a Bird Used to It

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Recently I visited a customer to deliver an order and was invited to come in and see their new rescued Macaw named Paulie. A beautiful Scarlet in a huge Prevue 3155 cage, the top third was loaded with toys and a large Booda Rope Swing. They said the macaw had not used the swing yet, as he seemed to be intimidated by the movement of it so it hung pristine and lonely. 
 
I suggested that using a piece of rope or a leather thong to tie the swing to the side of the cage so it would remain stationary and when Paulie touched it, it would not scare him. They liked the idea and planned to do that. It is not uncommon for a captive parrot, possibly never having been on a moving branch, a swing or a bungee to feel unsure about the movement. 
 

 With so many parrots born in captivity, they know nothing of trees, wobbly branches or vines that are normal to wild birds. Swings in a bird’s cage offer them play time, exercise and helps them retain their balancing skills. Our own Indian Ringneck, Sunshine was also afraid of things that moved and we too had to tie his swings to the cage including other moving items like a bungee until he felt confident on them and then we were able to remove the ties. While I was visiting with Paulie and his owners, I looked at the cage and its furnishings.
 
Paulie had many toys and even a treat dispenser, but they said he never played with the treat dispenser.  I looked at it and other toys and found they were placed out of reach of his perches. If he wanted to try out his Foraging Wheel he had no way to reach it except to crawl under some toys and hang on the cage bars to get to it.
 
I recommended that they move it to where he could sit and investigate it, and to also let him see them spin the wheel, get treats and eat them in front of him, perhaps offer him a piece or two as well. I suggested they add more toys and perches lower in his cage, but their concern was that Paulie would poop on them. I explained that careful placement would help keep lower perches clean and to move the toys that were filling the center of the cage top as that may be where he would like to sit but could not due to the crowded placement all at the top in the middle. 
 
The toys were literally blocking other toys, thus leaving many untouched. After explaining that the toys in their bird’s cage, were the leaves on their birds tree, and would naturally be near the outer walls of his cage with perches and empty areas in the middle so he could maneuver better from toy to toy and play with one without getting bopped with another that was too close. They seemed eager to re-arrange the cage so Paulie could get more out of the cage and the toys. The added perches could be simple bolt-on Manzanita Perches to Booda Rope Perches arranged so he could sit in different places, all with a different toy nearby. 
 
This is a well appointed cage
California bird cage filled with foraging & interactive bird toys
 
This would give him more exercise as well climbing and jumping to different perches. An interesting part of the visit was watching as Paulie would climb out of his cage and onto the floor, walk over to a T-shirt that was left on a chair and drag it across the room to a corner behind the sofa and sit with it. I asked if they had the bird sexed, they had not but were told it was a male, I told them I suspected it was a female and was trying to build a nest and they may want to name him/her Pauline or Paulette. This was amusing to the wife as her mother was named Paulette. 
 
They did admit they had to make covers for all the fronts of any low open areas. I asked how they handled their parrot and they said they kept their hands on his head and neck to avoid over stimulation. This was good to hear as even though sweet parrots do make one want to hold and cuddle and stroke them, they only then encourage the birds to become hormonal and look to build nests, lay eggs, or worse, bond with one of the couple and lash out at anyone else. Their home was large and roomy enough for their family, the macaw, 2 dogs and 3 cats, they said someone was home most of the time and the pets were supervised and they did put the macaw back in its cage if they had to go out.
 
I suggested they also consider some floor stands in various rooms for Paulie so the bird could join them when they left the main room. Doing this early in the birds time with them so he/she could get used to having places of its own to spend time on and be less interested in climbing on the sofa, chairs, cabinets and thus be removed. A parrot that has its own furniture is more likely to not be as destructive to the house and its furnishings.
 
written by catherine tobsing
approved by mitch rezman