When sun conures attack!

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Good morning and thanks for your time,

I enjoy reading your newsletters every Sunday, and I just knew yesterday, Sunday, I had to contact you. In short, my sweet female, 1.5 year old, sun conure decided to attack her sitter yesterday when she entered our home. Here is the scenario:

  1. We had three other people present whom she ignored.
  1. The Super Bowl was on. The constant annoying cheering of the tv fans.

Now, she did not attack her right away. Perhaps it was not intended to be attack mode. Once the sitter passed me and my bird Sofia, Sofia immediately flew towards her, the sitter, not expecting it, flailed her arms.

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Why 4 roommates 2 feathered and 2 human need to work things out.

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Jan 9, 6:36pm

Hello, I have two Caiques. The first we have had for 6 years and is sweet mostly. The second, we introduced about 2 years ago. At first, the two about killed each other, but now they are friends.

However, the second caique does have an issue with wanting to be super nice to me and then all of the sudden out for blood. It goes for fingers, almost always. I am fairly sure it had a bad childhood and feel awful for it. It has some great times, but then sometimes will revert and attack. It goes in phases.

I am curious if you have any ideas of how to break this? Currently, to hold the bird or get it, most times I need to have a towel, which it is so smart to hold it’s wings out so I cannot wrap it up. It flips out from the towel also so I cannot grab it, always going for fingers and biting. Thank you for any information! Sometimes I’m at my wits end with this bird, but have been trying and trying to make it have a great life.

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Birds are amoral, not bad. Humans are at fault and the problem source.

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Hello,

I love your birdie brunch and read it first thing every Sunday. Thank you!

I hope you can help me. I have an 8 yr. old white-bellied Caique. Conrad has owned me since he was 3 months old. I am also a strong proponent of flighted birds (seems to me they were made that way), so Conrad is fully-flighted.

He’s delightful and we are strongly bonded. He’s really a great bird and good company. HOWEVER, I don’t seem to be able to stop him from chewing on everything in sight. He has numerous toys of varying types and textures in all his houses (currently 3, not including travel), bbut when he’s out he chews on furniture, window sills, molding, electric cords, shoes, to name a few.

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Pepper our two and a half year old African Red-bellied Parrot

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Catherine,

Sorry for the delay.  I had full intentions of providing you with my take on the African Red Bellied parrot several weeks ago and life got in the way.  🙂
irst of all, let me introduce Pepper our two and a half year old ARB.  I am emphasizing two year old because we are going through what I can only hope is the terrible 2s stage and not a life long trait with him.

For a bit of history, this is not my first rodeo.  I was very active in owning, caring, training, and taming parrots many years ago.  I go back to the days when most were wild caught birds that required significant patience and attention.

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Christmas With My Parrots

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I just love this time of year with my parrots. Currently we’re singing and dancing to rambunctious Christmas carols while hubby wraps presents. It’s time to think about gift giving for your beaked family. Homemade toys are the answer, because like me, you probably have lots of things around, like wrapping paper tubes to make into foraging toys. Husband wraps with the pretty foil paper which isn’t suitable for them.

Most gift wrap paper tubes today don’t have glue on them, but check to be sure. I wrap all of my presents in newspaper for my human family. What parrot doesn’t enjoy a crumpled up ball of newspaper tossed in their direction? Or a newspaper house? May as well let the fun begin now.

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Canaries – Nature’s IPods – Why They Sing

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Before iPods there were boomboxes. Before boomboxes there were stereo radios. Precursors to phonographs were Victrolas. But the way to get tunes in your home long before there was electricity was the natural sound of bird songs. For years people would place a Canary in a small cage on either side of the room and whoever did that first can take credit for inventing stereo sound.

Canaries are small songbirds coming from the Finch family and were initially found in places like the Azores and believe it or not the Canary Islands

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Quickie on Cockatiel Care Chapter & Verse

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The Cockatiel is the smallest, actually a miniature Cockatoo, and is from Australia. The only bird more popular with caged bird keepers is a parakeet (budgie).

The Cockatiel is biologically classified as a genuine member of Cacatuidae because they share all of the Cockatoo family’s biological features.They are the only Cockatoo species which can sometimes reproduce by the time they are one year old

The Cockatiel’s distinctive erectile crest expresses the animal’s state of being. The crest is dramatically vertical when the cockatiel is startled or excited, gently oblique in its neutral or relaxed state, and flattened close to the head when the animal is angry or defensive.

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Scientists fundraise for conures

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Did you know the sun conure may be facing extinction in the wild, and you can help? There is a real need for more surveys to establish their status in nature. The 2014 estimates published on the IUCN database are between 1,000 and 1,499 mature birds. Some of the last known sun conures live in Guyana, a country with a small human population and a lot of forest and savannah grasslands.

The IUCN page mentions that the trade in wild conures is “ongoing” because “due to the ease with which birds can be attracted to bait (e.g. corn) and the large distances they will travel, it is easy to trap all the individuals in an area.” Quoted from Jamie Gilardi.

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Does It Matter What Sex My Bird Is as Long as He or She Knows Its Name?

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Does It Matter What Sex My Bird Is as Long as He or She Knows Its Name?

Why DNA is so VERY important even for your non-breeding parrot

About 20% of parrots, like budgies, eclectus and cockatiels that are sexually dimorphic. That means that the gender of the bird can be identified by physical differences. In the case of budgies and cockatiels, they have to reach near-adulthood to exhibit differences while eclectus are readily identifiable upon feathering out the first time since females are red and blue while males are green.

The sexual organs of birds are inside the body, making it impossible to tell gender by visually checking organs such as is done with dogs and cats. Some breeders claim to be able to identify gender of parrots that don’t exhibit differences visibly based on factors such as spread of pelvic bones upon reaching breeding age, shape of head and behavior. Perhaps some breeders are reasonably accurate, most are about as accurate as tossing a coin as a means of determining gender.

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Sexing Lovebirds – On the Cheap

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About a quarter of all parrots are sexually dimorphic meaning you can tell the sex by the color or markings of the bird or parrot. Green Eclectus parrots are boys, red ones are girls (as a side note as recently as ten or fifteen years ago zoos were placing 2 red Eclectus together hoping for mating.)

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Carl’s Severe Macaw – Is it plucking, molting or over-preening?

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Why are those feathers in the cage floor? Is it plucking, molting or over-preening?

We recently received an email from a subscribe of Sunday Brunch that I am sharing with you below:

I recently adopted a 15 year old Severe Macaw whose previous owner had a terminal illness. I could tell the Macaw had been taken care of meticulously from the written records of her care from Hatch Papers to recent complete blood panels however I never had the opportunity to question the previous owner concerning details of ‘Bandit”. I knew the moment I saw her that  I wanted her as I owned a Severe 30+ years ago and have known several over the years but none as sweet as this little girl.

We spend at least an hour each day cuddled up and grooming each other, over the last month I finished

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Classifications & Obfuscations Regarding Conure Parrots

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About two years ago, I spotted a bird in a pet store (large chain). On his glassed-in cage was the label “Sun Conure.”

I decided that I wanted a bird like that. First, I ordered a large cage from you; then I waited about 9 months for a bird to become available. During that time the label changed to “Fancy Conure” vice Sun Conure.

The bird I purchased, my friend “Conrad”, is identical in coloring and in temperament (as described in several references) to a Sun Conure. Since we haven’t mentioned any names of pet chains (so we aren’t subject to law suit!), can you offer any thoughts on the name change.

Crossbreed? Avoiding the endangered species controls? Has anyone else ever raised this question???

Sanford

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