Scenic bird food offers outstanding nutrition for any species of caged bird

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Editor’s note: we all like variety. They just opened a supermarket not far from us called Pete’s – it is 55,000 ft.² with not only groceries but prepared foods and salads.

This is what we demand as humans which is why we offer so many brands and varieties of bird food. 

Small birds can live 15 to 20 years – larger ones 40 to 60 years, some even longer. Don’t you think it’s important that your birds should enjoy variety in their diets for the decades they are going to be around?

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Why are veterinarians are injecting this poison into our birds?

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File under “Our vets are injecting this sh#t into our birds – really”?

The reason I bring this up is an article that came across my desktop recently having to do with a drug called “Lupron”. Popcorn our cockatiel received two injections (at $50 per shot) over her 12 visits with our vet.

I read about it a lot on Facebook – Lupron is used to reduce egg laying and calm hormonal changes in birds. It’s use is widespread in avian medicine. It is also available for cats and dogs.

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Nutrition of Psittacines (Parrot Family)

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Nutrition of Psittacines (Parrot Family) Client Information Series™
Th is information is designed as a means of communication between veterinarians and clients who are concerned about their pet bird’s nutritional needs. Diet, nutrient requirements, and feeding are discussed. If you have any questions, be sure to ask your veterinarian to answer them for you.

Birds are divided into 27 orders, varying from high-fl ying Falconiformes, such as the bald eagle, to the Struthioniformes, such as the ostrich, that do not fl y at all. Most pet birds are found among the Psittaciformes (psittacines: parrotsfamily), Passeriformes (perching birds), Columbiformes (pigeon family), and Galliformes (chicken-like birds).

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Bird chop vs commercial bird food blends – what’s best for my bird?

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I talk a lot about avian digestive systems and respiratory systems but it’s been awhile since we talked about feathers. Generally, the birds that we keep as pets have anywhere from 5000 to 7000 feathers. Waterfowl like certain species of ducks can have more than 11,000. Yes, scientists have actually counted them.

From Wikipedia we learn:

Feathers are among the most complex integumentary system appendages found in vertebrates and are formed in tiny follicles in the epidermis, or outer skin layer, that produces keratin proteins.

The β-keratins in feathers, beaks, and the claws, scales, and shells of reptiles — are composed of protein strands hydrogen-bonded into β-pleated sheets, which are then further twisted and crosslinked by disulfide bridges into structures even tougher than the α-keratins of mammalian hair, horns, and hoof.

β-keratin or beta-keratin is a protein in the keratin family. β-keratin is rich in stacked β pleated sheets. Keratin is one of a family of fibrous structural proteins. Keratin is the protein that protects epithelial cells from damage or stress.

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Hagen’s (HARI) Alternative Formula Pellets offer better nutrition for Mature birds

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December 10th of last year I sprained my ankle. I finally got my boot on that foot for the first time last week on 1/24/17. In less than a month Medicare will be paying all my medical expenses (in conjunction with a supplemental plan F policy). I can relate to getting old. I look old. I have a long gray beard. Look at me and you know that I’m old.

Not so much with birds

For those of you that have stuck with your birds through the screaming biting and destruction – kudos! You’ll learn how much life bird’s can bring into a home.

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8 Simple actions you can take to keep your bird healthy

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1 – Weigh your bird

Birds are prey animals. Evolution has taught them that if they look weak they are more subject to an attack by a predator in the wild. Thus it is not uncommon to see a bird appear to be healthy one day then fall over dead the next because there’s no visual symptoms like you can see with a cat or dog.

One of the most precise tools you can obtain for a mere $19 is our best bird scale ever which can be used to weigh birds from budgies to large macaws.

When you weigh your bird regularly at least twice a month you can easily see large swings in weight gain or loss possibly indicating an illness without being visible by looking at the bird.

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I’m declaring myself THE caged bird keeper’s influencer for the Internet.

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(no one else wanted the gig)

If you follow digital trends as I do, it’s impossible to not recognize “the next big thing in marketing” called influencer marketing something that’s actually been around since 1940

All the “experts” in the many LinkedIn groups I follow and blogs I read coming across my crowded inbox have very precise instructions on how to achieve influencer marketing.

Search for influencers, connect with influencers, reach out to influencers, tell the influencers what great stuff you have, offer cash and gold bullion with the goal of a said influencer with 3 million followers on Instagram happily talking to their fans and followers about what remarkable stuff you have to say. It’s nice you have an instruction document.

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10 plucking triggers your vet never talks about

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A woman replying in a Facebook thread about her self-mutilating parrot “my vet said that it’s become a habit that’s it very hard to break”

My response was “Ask your vet why these habits don’t develop in the wild”?

Another woman had spent $4000 between veterinarian bills and behaviorists. Her bird was still plucking. In the thread that evolved it turns out that her cages were filled primarily eucalyptus perches.

Although eucalyptus can be safe it also has a great many toxins that can be lethal to a bird. She also related that her bird got about one hour of daylight – none of this came up in the conversation with her veterinarian or behaviorist.

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Comparative Human and Bird Digestive & Respiratory Systems

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Comparative Physiology: Human and Bird

The human body uses food and liquids for energy, growth, maintenance and repair. Before it can use food and liquids for these purposes, it must go through a process called digestion, which is carried out by the digestive system. The digestive system consists of the following organs: Mouth, salivary glands, oesophagus, liver, gall bladder, pancreas, stomach, large and small intestines, duodenum, rectum and the anus.

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Canaries – Nature’s IPods – Why They Sing

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Before iPods there were boomboxes. Before boomboxes there were stereo radios. Precursors to phonographs were Victrolas. But the way to get tunes in your home long before there was electricity was the natural sound of bird songs. For years people would place a Canary in a small cage on either side of the room and whoever did that first can take credit for inventing stereo sound.

Canaries are small songbirds coming from the Finch family and were initially found in places like the Azores and believe it or not the Canary Islands

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Does It Matter What Sex My Bird Is as Long as He or She Knows Its Name?

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Does It Matter What Sex My Bird Is as Long as He or She Knows Its Name?

Why DNA is so VERY important even for your non-breeding parrot

About 20% of parrots, like budgies, eclectus and cockatiels that are sexually dimorphic. That means that the gender of the bird can be identified by physical differences. In the case of budgies and cockatiels, they have to reach near-adulthood to exhibit differences while eclectus are readily identifiable upon feathering out the first time since females are red and blue while males are green.

The sexual organs of birds are inside the body, making it impossible to tell gender by visually checking organs such as is done with dogs and cats. Some breeders claim to be able to identify gender of parrots that don’t exhibit differences visibly based on factors such as spread of pelvic bones upon reaching breeding age, shape of head and behavior. Perhaps some breeders are reasonably accurate, most are about as accurate as tossing a coin as a means of determining gender.

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Sexing Lovebirds – On the Cheap

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About a quarter of all parrots are sexually dimorphic meaning you can tell the sex by the color or markings of the bird or parrot. Green Eclectus parrots are boys, red ones are girls (as a side note as recently as ten or fifteen years ago zoos were placing 2 red Eclectus together hoping for mating.)

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