Is A Stainless Steel Bird Cage Worth The Investment?

many diameters of stainlesssteel tubing
Read in 14 minutes

What Size Cage?

Have you heard “buy the biggest cage you can afford”? Nonsense! We know happy well adjusted Macaws living in 30″ diameter round cages. How could they, you gasp?

The three Macaws I’m referring to have stay-at-home mom. They are out from 6:00 in the morning till 9:00 at night and are thrilled to go to sleep in their narrow cages.

So before you decide on a cage, you need to know what bar spacing to look for:

As long as the spacing between the bars is narrow enough to prevent injury if the bird tries to escape. The Bird’s head should not be able to fit between the bars.The door needs to be large enough to comfortably put your hand through, catch the bird, remove the bird, and replace the bird. For larger birds, it needs to be big enough so they don’t rub feathers on the bars every time they turn around. And like people, birds like to stretch (I know an African Grey that does Yoga). Just don’t cramp the bird.

For some general guidelines – Click here

What Species?

Different species, different needs.

Small species (Finches, Canaries, Lovebirds and Parakeets) deserve wider cages because birds travel side-to-side. Many of the small species never leave their cages. You have to let them fly because it’s heart healthy.

Medium and larger birds have a different set of needs. So let’s apply some common sense. Do you have a big bird? Are you away a lot? Then try to get a bigger cage. (Would you like to spend all day in a room the size of a closet?)

Bigger cages allow birds move about much like we move about our home. Ideally parrots like three zones. The upper zone, should have lots of toys and “cover”. Birds feel safe up high, not easily seen, like in the wild. (Don’t we feel comfy in our bedrooms?)

The middle zone is where they’ll spend the day, playing with toys, eating, hanging out.

The bottom is where they’ll go to look for food and toys that may have dropped. Parrots are scavengers in nature.

Do I need feeding doors

We suggest feeding doors for a couple of reasons. For the smaller birds, its less invasive than stick a hand in the cage. If you go away for a day or more with a larger bird, feeder door enable “bird sitters” to replace food and water without placing their hands in the cage.

What are breeding doors for?

Whether you breed or not you can’t keep female birds from laying eggs. You can attach a nest box to your cage over the nest box door opening. This enables the hen to lay and sit on her eggs (whether they are fertile or not) privately as nature intended.

What kind of top should the cage have?

Flat top – cages will allow play gyms or supplies to be placed up top. May allow for stacking of other cages.

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Author:

He's handled a 1000 birds of numerous species when they would visit their monthly birdie brunch in the old Portage Park (Chicago, IL) facility. The one with the parrot playground. Mitch has written and published more than 1100 articles on captive bird care. He's met with the majority of  CEO's and business owners for most brands in the pet bird space and does so on a regular basis. He also constantly interacts with avian veterinarians and influencers globally.